Spotlight on Susan Seed: A hospice supporter since day one #hospicehero #wirralhospice #caring #donating #fun #community #thankyou

Sue A“Do you think you can do anything with this handbag, dear?” Sue Seed pops into Wirral Hospice St John’s fundraising with a brand new bag she’s been gifted. “It’s no good to me you see, and I thought you could maybe offer it in a raffle or in the charity shops?” Sue often brings in items we can use and, after being around the hospice, ever since it opened, we’re always pleased to see her.

You’ll also catch her in our Hub Café, usually on a Tuesday and Thursday, enjoying a coffee and a catch-up with the staff and whoever else is around for a friendly chat. (Sue is pictured here on the left with Thelma and Carol from The Hub). Here’s a handy tip; Say hello to Sue and you’ll learn about all kinds of subjects, from TV dramas to Strictly Come Dancing, ham radio to Liverpool FC!

Sue is 84 years young now and has retired from volunteering. Her and husband, Alec, lived in Bebington when he retired from Shell in 1982. After spending some time enjoying their retirement together, Alec was also looking to ‘put something back.’ They began volunteering at the newly opened St John’s Hospice from the very beginning. Sue recalls our first matron, Matron Jones, as a lady brimming with hospice values

For more than 20 years Sue and Alec volunteered together. (Sue had also been volunteering at Clatterbridge Hospital for the WRVS in their tea bar). At Wirral Hospice St John’s they provided essential general support duties in our Inpatients ward  and they became immersed in all the events and occasions the hospice, and its supporters, put on for our whole Wirral community.

Sue and PatriciaSue, maiden name Currie, is from London. Her father had fought and survived World War 1 but sadly died in 1937 when Sue, and her twin sister, Patricia (Sue, aged 19, is on the left of their picture here) were only three years old. Sue also remembers them hiding under the stairs during World War 2 when the family lived in East Sheen, in south west London.

She reminisces about watching the air dog-fights between fighter aircraft and searching for shrapnel after the battles had ended. In the summer holidays the whole school would relocate to Yorkshire.

Between the ages of 18 and 21, Sue worked in the City of London. After the war, her mother moved around Greater London quite a bit until settling in Potters Bar when Sue was around 21. She then worked as a shorthand typist for the Diocesan Office of St Alban’s until she was twenty three.Sue Alec

At this time Sue visited a friend of her mum’s, ‘Auntie Jess’, (Mrs Seed), who lived in Wirral. She’d been unaware that Auntie Jess had a son, Alec, it was love at first sight!

They were married the very next year at Christ Church in Potters Bar. Over forty six years they built a life together, travelling around Europe. They loved the Canaries (*where the picture on the right was taken) and owned timeshare there. They also spent a lot of time at their caravan in the picturesque Shropshire retreat of Ellesmere.

Alec had been in the RAF during the war, working ground crew servicing Spitfires and Lancaster Bombers. Here he gained a lifelong interest in amateur radio, which Sue also enjoyed. He loved airshows and shared his love for Liverpool FC with Sue.

In 1992 they discovered that Alec had a heart condition. He lived as full a life as possible still, for another 12 years. He sadly died, in 2004.

Sue speaks to twin sister, Patricia, every night on the phone! Patricia lives in Norwich with her husband Tony, who is now 87, and Sue has three nephews and a niece all of whom she adores. Jenny, David, Timothy and Simon, have also given Sue between them, seven grand nieces and nephews. “They’re all brilliant.” she says, beaming!

Sue Seed

As well as her generous offers of material things for the hospice to raffle or sell, Sue collects some monthly membership fees for the hospice lottery for us. She also makes kind monetary donations to the various ‘giving’ initiatives we promote which help us to keep providing our essential nursing and care services at the hospice.

Sue has a distinctive ‘southern’ accent which has a charming lilt. Look out for her in the Hub Café and say hello! I promise you, it will be time well spent!ellesmere 2(Sue’s favourite view of Ellesmere – picture courtesy of shropshire-guide.co.uk)

Author: Billy Howard

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